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 Phrases  their meanings and origins - Page 6 Empty Phrases their meanings and origins

on Sat Oct 03 2015, 09:01
First topic message reminder :

Scot Free.

Meaning

Without incurring payment; or escaping without punishment.

Could this be the origin

Dred Scott was a black slave born in Virginia, USA in 1799. In several celebrated court cases, right up to the USA Supreme Court in 1857, he attempted to gain his freedom. These cases all failed but Scott was later made a free man by his so-called owners, the Blow family. Knowing this, we might feel that we don't need to look further for the origin of 'scott free'. Many people, especially in the USA, are convinced that the phrase originated with the story of Dred Scott.


Last edited by Admin on Wed Jan 13 2016, 11:11; edited 3 times in total

Corky Ringspot
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on Mon Jan 29 2018, 12:06
It's raining frogs in Paris this week. That's the French equivalent of “raining cats and dogs.” Lots and lots of rain. So much that the River Seine overflowed its banks, and towns across France are dealing with floods.


From drivel cometh knowledge  Phrases  their meanings and origins - Page 6 709307421
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on Sun Oct 21 2018, 16:22
Sods Law

A humorous or facetious precept stating that if something can go wrong or turn out inconveniently it will.

Only in my house No
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on Wed Apr 17 2019, 18:45
A red rag to a bull

To wave a red rag to a bull is to deliberately provoke it. More generally, the expression denotes any deliberate action intended to bring about an adverse reaction.


In the 17th century, to wave a red rag at someone was merely to chatter with them - 'red rag' was then a slang term for the tongue. This usage is cited in print as early as 1605 and is nicely illustrated in Francis Grose's definition in The

Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 1785:

"Shut your potatoe trap, and give your redrag a holiday."
tonker
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on Wed Apr 17 2019, 22:59
"How's your arse for blackheads"?

Meaning: "How are you feeling"?

Origin: - Unknown!
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on Wed Apr 17 2019, 23:16
tonker
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on Wed Apr 17 2019, 23:31
I heard Mac runs a weekend clinic solely for buttock blackheads!
Corky Ringspot
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 Phrases  their meanings and origins - Page 6 Empty Re: Phrases their meanings and origins

on Thu Apr 18 2019, 16:18
More bottomage! No
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