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raymyjamie
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An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Thu Mar 26 2015, 21:14
First topic message reminder :

Whilst researching for my quizzes this week I found some rather interesting web sites which list nautical terms and their meanings.

So shiver me timbers, splice the mainbrace and where's yer buccaneers (on the side of me bucc............... best not!!!!! Very Happy )


Nautical Words, an A to Z :-

'abaft' = Toward or at the stern of a ship; further aft

'bottomry'!!!!!!!!! = Using the ship as collateral to finance a sea voyage

'demurrage' = Delay of vessel's departure or loading with cargo

'escutcheon' = Part of ship's stern where name is displayed

'futtock' = Rib of a ship

'gudgeon' = metal socket into which the pintle of a boat's rudder fits

'hawsehole' !!!!!!! = Hole for ship's cable

'inboard' = Inside the line of a ship's bulwarks or hull

'jurymast' = Mast erected on ship in place of one lost

'keelhaul' = To punish sailor by dragging under keel of ship

'lutchet' = Fitting on ship's deck to allow mast to pivot to pass under bridges

'moonraker' = Topmost sail of a ship, above the skyscraper

'nipper' = The anchor cable was a nine-stranded cable-laid rope which came through the hawse-pipe, ran alongside the two capstans (on the main-deck), and was stowed down in the cable tier beneath the main deck. Nippers were short pieces of rope (stoppers) one end of which would be fastened to the 'messenger', the other end to the cable, and as the cable was hove in, and the 'nippers' reached the barrel of the larger capstan, small boys would 'fleet' them (i.e. untie and move them) and fasten them on again near the small capstan.

It was from such circumstances that the word 'nipper' entered our language as the name for a small boy.

'oakum' = Old ropes untwisted for caulking the seams of ships

'poop' !!!!!! = Enclosed structure at stern of ship above main deck

'quarterdeck' = Part of ship's deck set aside by captain for ceremonial functions

'rostrum' = A spike on prow of warship for ramming

'scuttlebutt' = A butt was a barrel. Scuttle meant to chop a hole in something. The 'scuttlebutt' was a water barrel with a hole cut into it so that sailors could reach in and dip out drinking water. The scuttlebutt was the place where the ship's gossip was exchanged.'

'trunnel' = A wooden shipbuilding peg used for fastening timbers

'unreeve' = To withdraw a rope from an opening

'vang' = A rope (line) leading from gaff to either side of the deck, used to prevent the gaff from sagging.

'windlass' = A winch used to raise a ship's anchor

'xebec' = A small three-masted pirate ship

'zabra' = A small Spanish sailing vessel

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Mac
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Mar 28 2015, 18:24
Found this:

2/6 heave
The original entry related to the term 4/6 heave which related to moving a fixed object belonging to (I believe) the Royal Navy (could be the RAF), one had to obtain a work order which was numbered 46. So when a group of squaddies (that's another one)were moving something, to make sure they all lifted at the same time someone called out. "4/6, Heave".
However, it turns out the term is actually 2, 6 heave!"
It's a naval expression, originally used when gun crews pulled the cannon in or out of the gun port. The 2 and the 6 related to the numbers of the men that were to pull- gunner 2 and gunner 6. Never heard it at school but my Dad, being a sailor, used it all the time. Normally shortened to just "2! 6!
If anyone can add to this - or to the 4/6 heave story, please do.

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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Mar 28 2015, 18:29

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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Mar 28 2015, 18:30
Well done Mac. The 3.5 ton gun obviously recoiled after firing. The royal navy employed a six man team to work each gun.

Numbers 2 and 6 where responsible for manoeuvring the gun into position. Number 1, the gun captain would bark out his orders using numbers rather than names hence 2, 6 heave rather than smudge topsey heave.
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Mar 28 2015, 18:32
The RN had this honed to such a fine art that they could fire, reload and fire again within ninety seconds.
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Mar 28 2015, 18:32
Excellent. More knowledge.
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Mar 28 2015, 18:36

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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Mar 28 2015, 18:42
I'd suspected it may have something to do with avoiding confusion, in the same way countdowns to firing don't include 'five', lest it be mistaken for 'fire'.
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sun Mar 29 2015, 11:51
"spare lash"
its that noise the anchor makes when you chuck it over the side
Very Happy
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sun Mar 29 2015, 13:32
BUGGER! I saw one on the telly this AM and meant to add it here.

Can't remember the swine now. But I had 'oops for me dinner.
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sun Mar 29 2015, 13:33
@QTPIE wrote:"spare lash"
its that noise the anchor makes when you chuck it over the side
Very Happy


HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

I missed that at first.

Real welders will tell you the one about the 'oggle oggle box'.
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Jan 07 2017, 19:19
Close quarters


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raymyjamie
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Jan 07 2017, 19:37
LOL Laughing Laughing Laughing

Nice and cozy.
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Jan 07 2017, 19:39
Just noticed on the OP, no word for letter "C".

Clinker built:-
A method of constructing hulls of boats and ships by fixing wooden planks and, in the early nineteenth century, iron plates to each other so that the planks overlap along their edges. The overlapping joint is called a land. In any but a very small boat, the individual planks will also be joined end to end; the whole length of one of these composite planks is a "strake". Same as "Lapstrake".
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Jan 07 2017, 19:48
See also Carvel built.

Hangonamo
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Jan 07 2017, 19:51
Carvel built or carvel planking is a method of boat building where hull planks are fastened edge to edge, gaining support from the frame and forming a smooth surface.

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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Jan 07 2017, 20:53
Our Queer Admiral...or....

Talk:Horatio Nelson
Contents [hide]
1 "Kiss me, Hardy." NOT ""Kismet, Hardy."
2 "I see no ships"
3 Unsourced
3.1 Quotations of others about Nelson
"Kiss me, Hardy." NOT ""Kismet, Hardy."[edit]
Kiss me Hardy, Or Kismet? - Mintguy@Wikipedia
"Kiss me, Hardy." - these are sometimes reported as his last words, but this was not the case, and in contemporary accounts he is reported to have made several more comments afterwards, before dying a short time later. ~ Kalki 22:37, 24 Aug 2004 (UTC)
I just reverted a great deal of speculative and incorrect commentary on these last words. That he said, and meant, "Kiss me, Hardy" in his last hours, after being mortally wounded is extensively documented in contemporary accounts, including that of people actually present. That they were not his actual last words is also extensively documented, though not as clearly in many popular accounts. "Kismet Hardy" is a phrase that seems to have become popularly substituted as if they "certainly" had been his "actual" words by some, but thus far I have absolutely no indication that this tale has anything but speculative origins to it, or that it even existed prior to the internet. I have not read the accounts in some time, but I believe that Hardy was reported to have kissed Nelson on the forehead in response, and all this occured hours before he actually ceased to talk. ~ Kalki 20:08, 24 Jun 2005 (UTC)
Actually rereading my comment on the page, which was made fresh after reading several early accounts, he kissed his cheek and then his forehead, though at least one account mentioned only the kiss on the forehead. ~ Kalki 20:38, 24 Jun 2005 (UTC)
I also have replaced this from the Famous last words page:
Kismet Hardy / Kiss me, Hardy
Who: British Vice Admiral Horatio Nelson. Nelson is rumoured to have said "Kismet Hardy" or "Kiss me, Hardy" whilst he was dying. Kismet means Fate. However, the OED gives the earliest use in the English language of "kismet" as 1849. Both versions are speculative and there's no record of anyone who was present at his death reporting either of them. These words were allegedly spoken to his Flag Captain, Thomas Masterman Hardy, who was alleged to have kissed his cheek and then his forehead.
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raymyjamie
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Jan 07 2017, 21:36
Some confusion it seems.

Anyroad, most interesting Fred
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Jan 07 2017, 21:40
Turn a blind eye
The phrase “turn a blind eye”—often used to refer to a willful refusal to acknowledge a particular reality—dates back to a legendary chapter in the career of the British naval hero Horatio Nelson. During 1801’s Battle of Copenhagen, Nelson’s ships were pitted against a large Danish-Norwegian fleet. When his more conservative superior officer flagged for him to withdraw, the one-eyed Nelson supposedly brought his telescope to his bad eye and blithely proclaimed, “I really do not see the signal.” He went on to score a decisive victory. Some historians have since dismissed Nelson’s famous quip as merely a battlefield myth, but the phrase “turn a blind eye” persists to this day.

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raymyjamie
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Jan 07 2017, 21:50
You actually want stuff like that to BE true
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sat Jan 07 2017, 21:58
Lord Horatio rules indubitably................... Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sun Jan 08 2017, 16:42

It has been said that Lady Hamilton spoke with a Lancashire accent
although she actually came from the Wirral.

Eee, I'll go t'foot of our poopdeck.
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Sun Jan 08 2017, 23:23
A dead marine = an empty bottle of alcohol .
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Mon Jan 09 2017, 21:05
BOX BOAT


Container ship
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

on Mon Jan 09 2017, 21:05
CHUNDER BOX

Toilet
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Re: An A to Z of Nautical Words

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